Aquifer Storage and Recovery: HB 655 Reduces Red Tape

Aquifer Storage and Recovery: HB 655 Reduces Red Tape

Reservoir-building is a Texas tradition – approximately 40 percent of the state’s water supply comes from these man-made lakes. While reservoirs are Texas’s traditional method of water storage, they are terribly inefficient. They lose large amounts of water to evaporation, sometimes over 40 percent of their storage. Total evaporation for the Highland Lakes was 192,404 acre-feet in 2011 – that’s more than the entire City of Austin’s 2011 water use (168,334 acre-feet). 

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Joint Legislative Committee Tackles Water Desalination

Joint Legislative Committee Tackles Water Desalination

Texans may soon have to turn to drinking recycled saltwater, brackish water, or maybe even wastewater from natural gas fracking. The current drought has forced the state to look into alternative water resources, including water reuse and conservation measures. One form of water reuse that has become more desirable to those working to solve Texas’ water shortage is desalination - the process of removing salt and impurities from water sources such as seawater and brackish water. While technologies are still being perfected to recycle oil, gas, and industrial wastewater for potable use, industry is currently capable of recycling their own wastewater for further use.  At the same time that Texas’ economy is booming due to the oil and gas industry, we have towns such as Wichita Falls dangerously close to running out of water. If we are to sustain our “Texas Miracle” we absolutely must ensure that we have water to supply to millions of Texans, and the businesses and industries that make our thriving economy so great.

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Desalinated Water Has Hidden Costs

Should water be free? No matter what answer, the truth is that our state is growing drier and drier as more and more people move here. Our state legislature, through the Joint Interim Committee to Study Desalination, is looking to technology to solve Texas’ water worries. However, they fail to consider the many complications around the costs of manufacturing new water.

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