“The Water of the Future will be Expensive Today”

“The Water of the Future will be Expensive Today”

Guest Author

In 1962, President John F. Kennedy boldly claimed, “If we could produce fresh water from salt water at a low cost, that would indeed be a great service to humanity, and would dwarf any other scientific accomplishment.” Today, as populations increase and water supplies are stretched, we are still hunting for ways to produce fresh water at a low cost. On November 6, 2014 in Austin, the Texas Water Development Board adopted rules needed to fully implement the State Water Implementation Fund for Texas, the $2 billion funding mechanism meant to provide low-cost loans for water projects in Texas.

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Joint Legislative Committee Tackles Water Desalination

Joint Legislative Committee Tackles Water Desalination

Texans may soon have to turn to drinking recycled saltwater, brackish water, or maybe even wastewater from natural gas fracking. The current drought has forced the state to look into alternative water resources, including water reuse and conservation measures. One form of water reuse that has become more desirable to those working to solve Texas’ water shortage is desalination - the process of removing salt and impurities from water sources such as seawater and brackish water. While technologies are still being perfected to recycle oil, gas, and industrial wastewater for potable use, industry is currently capable of recycling their own wastewater for further use.  At the same time that Texas’ economy is booming due to the oil and gas industry, we have towns such as Wichita Falls dangerously close to running out of water. If we are to sustain our “Texas Miracle” we absolutely must ensure that we have water to supply to millions of Texans, and the businesses and industries that make our thriving economy so great.

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Desalinated Water Has Hidden Costs

Should water be free? No matter what answer, the truth is that our state is growing drier and drier as more and more people move here. Our state legislature, through the Joint Interim Committee to Study Desalination, is looking to technology to solve Texas’ water worries. However, they fail to consider the many complications around the costs of manufacturing new water.

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